Secrets from “Brand Gods” such as Nike and Apple to help you sell more. Today!

 

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Author Walt Kuenstler uses intelligence, wit and historical perspective to make the point that customers don’t buy products — they are looking for seemingly magical solutions to their life’s problems.

Ancient myths tell us that there are gods and spirits who can grant any wish we have. All you have to do is say the right prayer, or offer the right sacrifice, and your dreams will come true. Those long-ago gods now live inside today’s top brands. Venus, the goddess of love, now whispers Victoria’s Secret in our ear. Dionysus, the god of wine, now lifts his glass and says “This Bud’s for you.”

Consumer behavior is governed by these timeless archetypal patterns. And shoppers become eager converts to whatever product offers the most enticing brand gospel. While science may have replaced the supernatural in our public conversation, ancient cravings for heavenly solutions still heat our blood-and our VISA cards.

Even common advertising vocabulary carries its own magic. For example, the word “logo” seems simple enough. Until you discover that it comes from a much, much older term, “Logos” which translates as “the word of god that brings order to the universe.” No wonder those logos for Nike and Coca Cola can carry so much power in the market and are universally recognized around the globe.

You’ll meet early advertising pioneers such as Bruce Barton, who took on Jesus Christ as his client, and discover how John Wanamaker wrote fairy tales to build a retailing empire. Drawing upon luminaries including Carl Jung, Camille Paglia, Plato, Kierkegaard and even Roy Rogers, Myth, Magic & Marketing is required reading for everyone in brand management, advertising, and marketing

 

 

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